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 2/11/2013
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9:00am10:00amEstablishing Quality Outcomes on Three Levels: Program, Course, and Lesson
Bobbe Baggio, Director of Graduate Program in Instructional Technology Management at LaSalle University
This session will discuss the organization needed to design, develop and implement an assessment and evaluation process that communicates an ongoing and cyclical process for continuous improvement in student learning. It will establish a process that is transparent for the learners, faculty, administration and accreditation.
Dr. Baggio is an accomplished author, speaker and educator. Her specific expertise is in how people learn and how to use technologies to help them learn. Her company Advantage Learning Technologies, Inc. (ALT) has provided ID services and implemented projects for clients in finance, healthcare, gasses and chemicals, manufacturing, distribution, construction, government and higher education. A more detailed list of clients can be found on her web site at http://www.bobbebaggio.com. Bobbe provides programs and products so that people who are trying to use technology for teaching and learning can do so effectively. She is currently the Director of the Graduate Program in Instructional Technology Management at La Salle University in Philadelphia, PA and speaks regularly to organizations and companies around the globe. Her latest books include You Listen with Your Eyes and The Pajama Effect. Bobbe’s prior experience includes being a Senior Scientist, Management Consultant, Director of IT, and Director of Software Development. Her education includes a BA from Waynesburg College, MA from West Virginia University, MS from Lehigh University and PhD Capella University.
2/11/2013 9:00 AM2/11/2013 10:00 AMCourse DesignMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/11/2013
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10:00am11:00amIntegrating QM into a Consistent Learner Experience for Online Degree Programs
Barbara Stebbins, University of Southern Maine
Scott Kimball, University of Southern Maine
In creating a Consistent Learner Experience (CLE) for new online degree programs, it is important to align
elements of the CLE with QM General Standards. Instructional designers and faculty meet to discuss the elements of the CLE, starting with a template that satisfies many standards of QM in form. The final CLE and course
template are created and introduced to program faculty at a professional development day.
2/11/2013 10:00 AM2/11/2013 11:00 AMQuality MattersMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/22/2013
4
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12:00pm1:00pmA Systematic Approach to Training Faculty to Teach via a Two-Way Interactive Television System
Karen Jarret Thoms, St. Cloud State University
This session addresses a systematic approach to training faculty to teach via two-way interactive television (ITV).
 
2/22/2013 12:00 PM2/22/2013 1:00 PMITV/VideoconferencingMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/11/2013
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1:00pm2:00pmExamining Interaction and Immediacy Behaviors in Distance Education
Kathy Bohnstedt, George Mason University
This session examines the experiences of professors teaching in a multi-point videoconferencing instructional environment and how they interacted with students in proximate and remote classrooms. Qualitative and quantitative data were analyzed to gain an understanding of the teaching experience and examine differences between instructor interaction and immediacy behaviors based on student location. Results indicate that no clear difference existed in instructor interaction behaviors with local and remote populations, but that they engaged in more immediacy behaviors with the remote population in their classes. Additionally, instructor interaction behaviors were more closely tied to student interaction behavior than to student location.
Dr. Kathy Bohnstedt received her PhD in Instructional and Assistive Technology from George Mason University. She has more than 20 years’ experience in instructional and information technology administration, distance education support, the design of instructional spaces, and faculty technology training and support in higher education. She is currently serving as an Instructional Technologist with the Volgenau School of Engineering at George Mason University, and has served as the managing editor of the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education. Her research interests center on the impact of technology on instructional interaction, the design of flexible learning environments, and the use of collaborative technology applications in distance education.
2/11/2013 1:00 PM2/11/2013 2:00 PMITV/VideoconferencingMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/11/2013
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2:00pm3:00pmMaking the switch: Moving from Wimba Classroom to Blackboard Collaborate
Charles Rigdon, University of Missouri
This session will discuss how the University of Missouri, Columbia made the transition from Wimba Classroom to Blackboard Collaborate.
Charles works as an Educational Technology specialist at the University of Missouri. He supports Blackboard Collaborate, Tegrity, Clickers, Kaltura and a number of other educational technologies. He works with faculty and staff and also handles the administration side of these technologies.
2/11/2013 2:00 PM2/11/2013 3:00 PMTeaching & LearningMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/11/2013
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3:00pm4:00pmMaking Group Work Better: Tips and Techniques for Facilitating Interaction
Andrea Stone, Oklahoma State University
Online course quality measures recommend student interaction and group activities, but these can be difficult. This session offers strategies for facilitation of online group work.
2/11/2013 3:00 PM2/11/2013 4:00 PMTeaching & LearningMondayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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9:00am10:00amStrategies for Designing and Redesigning Courses
Scott Gaier, Taylor University
Drawing upon the concepts of scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning, one of the best approaches for increasing learning and overall successful teaching is to design a course to include research and evaluation for helping a professor determine what helped and hindered student learning. This session will present and discuss course design methods and strategies that help to increase a teacher’s ability to evaluate the course and make effective changes for enhancing learning. Participants will be equipped to apply these strategies to their courses.
Dr. Scott Gaier currently serves as the Coordinator of Academic Enrichment at Taylor University where he oversees Taylor’s Academic Enrichment Center which includes first year transition initiatives, retention efforts, disability support services, and interventions for academically at-risk students. Scott has been at Taylor University since 2006.
2/12/2013 9:00 AM2/12/2013 10:00 AMCourse DesignTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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10:00am11:00amTech-Fueled Teaching and Learning
C.J. DeJuliis, Instructional Technology Manager, Teaching and Learning Center, California University of Pennsylvania

Integrating multimedia rich content into your content management system (D2L).  The benefits of adding Mediasite catalog pages, utilizing embed code and or links to external resources into your courses.  Advantages and disadvantages of controlling permissions to the content along with information on the added value of the analytical data that can be collected from users viewing the content.  In addition, there will be a preview of Mediasite’s recently added (MDR) Mediasite Desktop Recorder which allows for capturing lecture content from your computer system and uploading existing video content for viewer access. 


Note:  This presentation demonstrates resources that can be utilized to create a multimedia enhanced learning environment and to support the blended/flipped classroom teaching method.              

Christopher John (C.J.) DeJuliis joined the Cal U staff in 2001 as an information technology technician. After completing a master’s degree in multimedia technology at Cal U, he began teaching as an adjunct faculty member in the Applied Engineering and Technology Department, where he has taught courses in Communicating Technical Design, Information Systems, and Transportation Systems.  Within his current role in the Teaching and Learning Center he aids faculty, staff and the University community with implementing an array of technologies into the Teaching and Learning environment.
2/12/2013 10:00 AM2/12/2013 11:00 AMFlipped ClassroomTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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11:00am12:00pmDesigning Distance Education for Access and Equity: Structure and Content
Irene Duranczyk, University of Minnesota
Jeanne Higbee, University of Minnesota
Whether designing course shells, course content, or open access texts, the principles of universal instructional design (UID) and integrated multicultural instructional design (IMID) share common goals, techniques, and skills. The presenters will demonstrate how to maximize the structural tools and incorporate culturally-inclusive educational techniques for an accessible distance or hybrid graduate or undergraduate course.
2/12/2013 1:00 PM2/12/2013 2:00 PMCourse DesignTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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1:00pm2:00pmEnhancing Online Learning with Video Elements
Glen Jenewein, Kaplan University
 The ability to enhance online courses with simple video elements helps students to not only complete assignments, readings, and discussions, it helps students to check into your classes more often thus you are able to retain students. This presentation will demonstrate how to create a simple video, compress it, and access code to embed the file into your Course Management System or even upload to a website, blog or YouTube. The best thing is, no expensive equipment or software is required, and for the most part it will cost you nothing except time.
Glen J. Jenewein currently resides in Battle Ground, Washington and has been a Professor at Kaplan University since 2003 in the School of Information Technology. Glen also has been a Visiting Professor with DeVry University since 2003.

Mr. Jenewein most recently worked at Clark College, located in Vancouver, Washington, as the Director of eLearning. Mr. Jenewein was also a full-time professor at Portland Community College, in Portland Oregon, where he taught in the computer information systems program and served as the Chair of the department. Mr. Jenewein spent 13 years in the U.S. Navy as a communications officer and was instrumental in establishing communications from the South Pole to Paramus, New Jersey, for the National Science Foundation.

Glen the course lead for three courses at Kaplan University along with serving as the faculty advisor for the KU Association for Computing Machinery and the School of Information Technology’s Honor Society; Iota Sigma Tau.
2/12/2013 2:00 PM2/12/2013 3:00 PMInstitutional IssuesTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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2:00pm3:00pmiPads in Graduate Professional Education
Norma I. Scagnoli, Director of eLearning in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
Without a clear understanding of its effectiveness in ehancing learning or engagement, mobile technology is growing, and its insertion in educational settings is becoming more prevalent.  This presentation focuses on a study of the effects of the use of iPads by students in a graduate professional program in Management.  Results conclude with recommendations for flawless integration.
 
Norma I. Scagnoli is the Director of eLearning in the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she plays a key role in faculty development and integration of technology in classroom teaching and learning. Norma has extensive experience in online education as instructor, administrator and researcher. Before that, she was Program Coordinator of CTER, an online masters program for teachers at the College of Education, University of Illinois. She has also contributed to the field with her research on technologies for teaching and learning, online learning models, and faculty and student orientation for online education, which has been published and presented in specialized journals and conferences. Norma has a Ph.D. in Human Resource Development from the University of Illinois, where she also earned a Masters degree in Education with specialization in Instructional Technologies.
2/12/2013 2:00 PM2/12/2013 3:00 PMiPadsTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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3:00pm4:00pmInnovative Models for American Universities
Fred Hurst, Northern Arizona University
Alison Leigh Brown, Northern Arizona University
This blended session showcases a new initiative at Northern Arizona University (NAU) and a new resource available from the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) around prior-learning assessment (PLA) and other innovative practices to promote student success. NAU is creating a new university from scratch. This personal learning initiative will combine innovative practices from peer institutions, including prior-learning assessment, competency-based learning, open educational resources, multiple learning modalities, a self-paced, open-entry, open-exit student experience, and additional original concepts to create a new model for American universities. Expanding on the potential role of PLA as a best practice, the second part of this session will introduce you to LearningCounts, a new resource developed by CAEL to provide institutions and adult learners with access to quality, rigorous assessments of prior learning. It will also show how the PLA process helps students save time and money.
Fred Hurst is senior vice president for Extended Campuses at Northern Arizona University (NAU) in Flagstaff Arizona since 1999.  NAU has a long tradition of serving students with innovative electronic and face to face distributed learning courses and programs with state and national enrollments doubling over the last 10 years to over 7,700.  Fred is responsible for providing access to students in traditional face-to-face courses and via the Web.  Student services are provided by 37 campuses throughout Arizona and a service center.  Hurst expanded technology-delivered degree and certificate programs from one to 71, with total revenue generation $59 million with expenditure budget authority of $33 million.   He is the architect for NAU’s Personalized Learning competency-based education initiative, recently awarded a $1 million Gates Foundation grant. He serves the North Central Association (NCA) Higher Learning Commission as a member of the Institutional Actions Council (IAC), team chair and consultant-evaluator, and has been a past evaluator with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). 
Prior to moving to Arizona, he served as the founding executive director of the Florida Virtual Campus and the Florida Public Postsecondary Distance Learning Institute initiatives for the 28 state community colleges and 10 public universities serving 65,000 distance learning students.   He was a founding member of the planning, implementation and operational team for the University of Maine System’s Education Network of Maine as dean of information technologies and chief information officer.  He started his higher education career in educational technology and was a tenured graduate faculty member at Wichita State University.
 
Alison Leigh Brown is associate vice president for extended programs at Northern Arizona University and professor of philosophy.   Before that she was co-director of interdisciplinary studies and applied studies programs in extended programs, also at Northern Arizona University.
2/12/2013 3:00 PM2/12/2013 4:00 PMInstitutional IssuesTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/12/2013
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7:00pm8:00pmUsing Teamwork in an Online Class: Five Successful Strategies
Leanne Chun, Leeward Community College
Lani Uyeno, Leeward Community College
This presentation will highlight an online introductory computer science course's use of teamwork with video highlights from other online STEM courses. Context & Problem Employers are looking for college graduates who demonstrate teamwork and collaboration skills, but how do we help students develop these skills in online courses? One approach is to include teamwork as a requirement in an online course. But how does the instructor handle problems with students who do not want to be on a team or refuse to communicate or participate with their teams? What about the opposite problem: students who take over the team? How do you work with someone who does not want to take on the role of leader? What if the team produces poor work or does not plan properly? Approach to Successful Teamwork Audience will be asked to pair-share their experiences of using teams in online classes, including what has worked well and problems they have faced. Out of this discussion, we will share the following: Five strategies for successful teamwork in online classes will be shared, including the following: Sharing clear expectations with the teams Preparing students for the experience Facilitating team communication Meeting with the teams Providing assessment In groups of four, session participants will come up with a sixth strategy. Results In the introductory computer science course, data for the last five years has been tracked with online teamwork being introduced in year 3. Retention, Success and Withdrawal rates and quality of student work will be summarized, analyzed, and results presented.
2/12/2013 7:00 PM2/12/2013 8:00 PMTeaching & LearningTuesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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9:00am10:00amState Authorization From A-Z
Pamela Shay, Franklin University
Sharyl Thompson , American College of Education 
 

 
Recently revised federal regulations raised awareness regarding state authorization requirements for institutions serving students in multiple states. Many institutions are just beginning the state authorization process, and others have achieved authorization but are wondering how to manage the tracking and renewal processes. Wherever you are on the continuum, you will not want to miss this presentation, which will provide guidance and how-tos from individuals who have years of experience and have gained expertise in this area. Attendees are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the state authorization issues prior to the session (you can view WCET resources at http://wcet.wiche.edu/advance/state-approval).
With over 25 years of experience in higher education, Dr. Pamela Shay is well-versed in the intricacies of governmental and regulatory compliance. Currently, as Vice President of Accreditation & Institutional Effectiveness at Franklin University in Columbus, Ohio, Dr. Shay oversees several University offices that deal directly with accreditation, assessment, state authorization, institutional data, and regulatory compliance. Dr. Shay is a site evaluator and board member for the International Assembly of Collegiate Business Education (IACBE), serves on the leadership team of the State Authorization Network – Ohio, led Franklin’s self-study and reaccreditation process with the Higher Learning Commission in 2007-2008, and currently serves as the University’s liaison with the HLC. Dr. Shay has presented on the topics of accreditation, authorization and compliance for large groups at HLC, IACBE, NASASPS and WCET conferences, as well as leading online and face-to-face workshops on these topics.
 
Sharyl Thompson has extensive experience in the field of state authorization, having served in that capacity for over 11 years at Capella University. In early 2012 she accepted the position of VP, Regulatory Affairs and Compliance with American College of Education (ACE) in Indianapolis, IN. In addition to overseeing state authorization and program approvals leading to professional licensure for educators, Sharyl is the Accreditation Liaison for ACE with the Higher Learning Commission. She served on the drafting team through the President’s Forum and the Council on State Governments to create model legislation that would allow for reciprocity of state authorization across state boundaries. She also serves on the WCET Steering Committee. Sharyl has presented at numerous regional and national conferences on the topic of state authorization.
2/11/2013 9:00 AM2/13/2013 10:00 AMInstitutional IssuesWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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10:00am11:00amExploring ePortfolio Variations for Learning
James Wolff, Boston University School of Public Health
Rob Schad, Boston University School of Public Health
This session will explore adaptations for e-portfolios to facilitate teaching and learning. In a variety of courses, portfolios were created and reflections provided by individuals, teams and faculty. Hyperlinks between individual, group and course portfolios enabled a community of learners which included faculty and students, as well as collaborating agencies.
2/13/2013 10:00 AM2/13/2013 11:00 AMTeaching & LearningWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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11:00am12:00pmIncorporating Elements of Suspense to Facilitate Robust Online Discourse
Sherry Southard, Clayton State University
Christie Burton, Clayton State University
Mara Mooney, Clayton State University
Asynchronous online threaded discussions are widely recognized as a tool to enhance learning in the virtual classroom.  While they can serve as a mechanism for reinforcing material and promoting a deeper understanding of course content, discussion boards often lack rich and dynamic dialogue, and instead serve as a field of obligatory discourse, hasty postings, and repetitive content.  This study examines measures to promote meaningful interaction in threaded online discussion postings.  The researchers created an innovative, activity-based exercise, the “suspense model,” that was utilized in two undergraduate hybrid online courses to promote student-centered learning and to increase the quality and quantity of student engagement.  The researchers conducted a second discussion board activity in the same classes whereby students were provided with the problem and supporting material at the outset of the exercise.  Qualitative methods were employed to measure student perceptions of learning, the quality of student performance on the exercises, and levels of interactivity.  Results indicate that students more promptly and thoroughly engaged in the discussion board utilizing the suspense model, although student perception of the exercise was not altogether favorable as compared to its conventional counterpart.
Sherry Southard earned her Juris Doctor from Arizona State University and holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Management from the University of Nevada.  As the senior and managing associate with Forrest B. Johnson & Associates for six years, she worked as a trial attorney. Her areas of concentration were medical malpractice, catastrophic personal injury, tort and general litigation. In this position, she successfully argued Service Merchandise, Inc. v. Jackson, 221 Ga. App. 897, 473 S.E.2d 209 (1996) before the Georgia Court of Appeals.  After leaving that position in 1999, she worked as a sole practitioner. This transition gave her the independence to integrate her legal and business skills and share her knowledge. She has been engaged in numerous business ventures, including the co-ownership of a women’s consignment clothing boutique that sold couture designer merchandise in downtown Atlanta. Professor Southard served as an adjunct instructor at Herzing College and in the Atlanta Public School System Law Magnet Program before she accepted a full-time teaching position at CSU. She has taught courses in business law, introduction to the law, contracts and torts, business organizations, legal issues for managers, legal research and writing, advanced writing, technical writing, leadership skills, speech and technology and the law.  In order to further her professional skills while teaching, she served as a legal consultant for various local corporations and an arbitrator for the Atlanta Better Business Bureau. She also served as an Advisory Board Member to the Legal Aid Society, an organization that provides quality legal services to low-income individuals.
 
Christie H. Burton earned her doctorate from The George Washington University in human resource development  with a focus on human and organizational learning  and is the program coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Science degree program at Clayton State University. Research interests include the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) and organizational culture. As a former Army officer and member of her institution’s Veterans Task Force, Dr. Burton’s more recent research has explored female service members’ issues and student veterans’ transition and persistence in higher education. Dr. Burton serves on the board of the International Society for Exploring Teaching and Learning (ISETL).
 
Mara Mooney is a graduate of Lafayette College in Easton, PA (B.A. cum laude; Phi Beta Kappa) and Emory University School of Law (Emory Law Review; Dean's Fellow in Legal Research and Writing). She has been involved in paralegal education since 1996 and has taught at paralegal programs in Pennsylvania and Georgia. She is the author of the textbook, Fundamentals of Georgia Real Estate Law, and she researches and presents in the areas of legal studies education and pedagogical practices and standards.  She acted as Coordinator of the CSU Paralegal Studies Program from 2000-2003, and from 2003-present is a full-time teacher in the program who also academically advises students. Prior to joining the faculty at Clayton State, she was an associate with Alston & Bird, LLP in Atlanta, GA. Her law practice focused on representing commercial real estate clients. At CSU, Ms. Mooney teaches Introduction to Law & Ethics, Legal Research & Writing, Real Estate Law, Computers in the Law, and Law Office Skills.
 
Sherry Southard earned her Juris Doctor from Arizona State University and holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Management from the University of Nevada.  As the senior and managing associate with Forrest B. Johnson & Associates for six years, she worked as a trial attorney. Her areas of concentration were medical malpractice, catastrophic personal injury, tort and general litigation. In this position, she successfully argued Service Merchandise, Inc. v. Jackson, 221 Ga. App. 897, 473 S.E.2d 209 (1996) before the Georgia Court of Appeals.  After leaving that position in 1999, she worked as a sole practitioner. This transition gave her the independence to integrate her legal and business skills and share her knowledge. She has been engaged in numerous business ventures, including the co-ownership of a women’s consignment clothing boutique that sold couture designer merchandise in downtown Atlanta. Professor Southard served as an adjunct instructor at Herzing College and in the Atlanta Public School System Law Magnet Program before she accepted a full-time teaching position at CSU. She has taught courses in business law, introduction to the law, contracts and torts, business organizations, legal issues for managers, legal research and writing, advanced writing, technical writing, leadership skills, speech and technology and the law.  In order to further her professional skills while teaching, she served as a legal consultant for various local corporations and an arbitrator for the Atlanta Better Business Bureau. She also served as an Advisory Board Member to the Legal Aid Society, an organization that provides quality legal services to low-income individuals.
 
Christie H. Burton earned her doctorate from The George Washington University in human resource development  with a focus on human and organizational learning  and is the program coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Science degree program at Clayton State University. Research interests include the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) and organizational culture. As a former Army officer and member of her institution’s Veterans Task Force, Dr. Burton’s more recent research has explored female service members’ issues and student veterans’ transition and persistence in higher education. Dr. Burton serves on the board of the International Society for Exploring Teaching and Learning (ISETL).
2/13/2013 1:00 PM2/13/2013 2:00 PMTeaching & LearningWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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1:00pm2:00pmWhat Do Unsuccessful Online Students Want Us to Know?: Monroe CC's Online Retention Student Survey Results
Marie Fetzner, Monroe Community College
Over the past ten years, MCC conducted three administrations of a student survey targeted at non-successful online students (grade of F or W). The proposed presentation shares summary information of the findings of these three combined retention surveys. Who would benefit from this presentation: Novice through experienced online learning practitioners can benefit from this presentation because it provides information that comes directly from students who were not successful in their online course. What will participants will learn: Participants will learn: 1) the top ten reasons why MCC online students felt they were not successful in their online course, 2) the advice that non-successful online students would give to other learners who were considering taking an online course, and 3) some unexpected findings that emerged from the three survey administrations. Session Outcomes: 1. Participants will gain an understanding of student-reported barriers to success for online learners. 2. Participants will learn the advice that MCC students would share with their peers who were considering an online course. 3. Participants will gain an understanding of the pros and cons of surveying non-successful online students.
Marie Morin Fetzner, Ed.D., is an adjunct Assistant Professor at Monroe Community College (MCC) in Rochester, NY. In August 2012, Marie retired as the MCC Assistant to the VP, Educational Technology Services, after 25 years of service. 
Marie was a founding member of the Monroe Model team that was created in 1997 to support MCC’s online learning faculty and students. She coordinated the online faculty training efforts at MCC, and for more than twelve years has conducted research on online student retention. Marie has presented on online learning issues at numerous conferences and has authored or co-authored several articles on online student retention.

Marie serves on the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks (JALN) Advisory Panel for Access, and has co-facilitated a Sloan-C workshop on online student retention for several years. She is a Mentor for the Sloan-C Online Teaching Certificate (OTC) program, is a Certified Quality Matters™ Reviewer, serves as a reviewer for MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching), and serves on an editorial panel for JOLT (the Journal of Online Learning and Teaching).
Marie has developed online courses, assisted in the development of a cost/benefit model for MCC's online learning program, and has taught online courses for more than a decade.

Marie earned an Ed.D. from the University of Rochester where her dissertation was focused on online student retention. She holds a Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) degree from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Brockport, and earned a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music. 

2/13/2013 1:00 PM2/13/2013 2:00 PMInstitutional IssuesWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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2:00pm3:00pmOnline Student Orientation – A Preemptive Way to Support Learners that Helps Meet QM Standard 7.1
James Johnson, Pierce College Military Programs
Stormy Mascitelli, Pierce College Military Programs
Online orientations can help students more easily adapt to the rigors distance learning brings to their educational pursuits. Online orientations help create a solid base students can use to be successful in distance education. The Pierce College Military Program has created an online orientation for students addressing Academic and Student Services, Technical Support, and Accessibility. Actual material and resources used for the orientations will be shared as attendees are taken from concept to fruition.
2/13/2013 2:00 PM2/13/2013 3:00 PMQuality MattersDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/13/2013
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3:00pm4:00pmDirty Rotten Plagiarizers
Stephani Cuddie, Florida Institute of Technology
Lisa Gill, Florida Institute of Technology
This session will discuss how a university which offers online degrees is exposing students to plagiarism and its repercussions early as well as how they are reacting to plagiarism quickly in an effort to avoid the student becoming a repeat offender.
Stephani Cuddie is Manager, of online CoPLA programs.  I hold a BS and an MS in Information Technology and am currently pursuing an EdD in Distance Education.  I supervise the day to day operations of the COPLA Online department, work with faculty and adjuncts to develop and continuously improve courses. 
 
Lisa Gill graduated with a BS in History from University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh, completed a Graduate Teaching Certificate at University of Central Florida, and is currently working on her MS in Technical and Professional Communication at Florida Institute of Technology. She is currently the Program Coordinator for the College of Psychology and Liberal Arts Online Programs. She has worked in higher education for the last 10 years, always assisting students to accomplish their goals of higher education.
2/13/2013 3:00 PM2/13/2013 4:00 PMInstitutional IssuesWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/22/2013
5
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2:00pm3:00pmiPads for the iProfs
Seema Imam, National Louis University
In an effort to strengthen our commitment to teaching and learning for the 21st century classroom our elementary education MAT program began to focus on integrating technology in both the University and K-12 classrooms. The elementary education program purchased six iPads for members of the department. In addition, faculty in other departments who teach in the certification program and who were already iPad owners were invited to participate in a monthly colloquium, along with the new iPad recipients. The goal of this program was to start an iPad cohort, where all students in the program would purchase iPads. To enhance their teaching and learning skills all professors teaching in the cohort had six months of professional development using their iPads, selecting useful apps, planning new presentations, and assignments to best teach these prospective elementary school teachers. The community of professors worked together to teach each other about useful Apps, ways to use the iPad to teach, and pluses and minuses of the tablet in the classroom.
 Goals of this session: Goals: 1. To describe the practice of developing a community of learners around the iPad in education. 2. To share resources collected by the community. 3. To demonstrate evidence of the effectiveness of working together as a faculty cohort to create a variety of sample iPad rich lessons and assignments for use in upcoming teacher education cohort. 4. To discuss the process of selecting accessible and affordable apps, which faculty felt would best meet the needs of the cohort. 5. To describe a replicable iPad orientation planned to kick off the pre-service cohort so that students feel a sense of community, supported and guided in order to become quickly accustomed to their new tool for learning and teaching electronically.
2/22/2013 2:00 PM2/22/2013 3:00 PMiPadsWednesdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/14/2013
2
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10:00am11:00amCollaborating for Quality: A Discussion of Approaches to Course Design and Development
Penny Ralston-Berg, Penn State University World Campus
Desmond McCaffrey, University of Connecticut
Karla Kmetz, University of South Florida
The collaborative relationship between designer and instructor-expert can have a tremendous impact on
quality. Join this panel of practicing instructional designers to discuss the processes, practices, and team configurations that lead to quality online courses. How can collaboration be nurtured? How can momentum be maintained during the course development process? How does the game design and development process inform course design and increase quality? Learn more about these topics or bring your own questions to this lively discussion.
Penny is currently an instructional designer for the Penn State World Campus. Her research interests include student perspectives of quality and how this impacts the design practice. She recently co-authored the book *MindMeld: Micro-Collaboration between eLearning Designers and Instructor Experts* with Jon D. Aleckson (http://www.atwoodpublishing.com/books/345.htm)
 
For over 10 years, Desmond McCaffrey has been active in curriculum development, instructional design, faculty development, and institutional efforts to increase quality in online education. He currently leads the University of Connecticut's eCampus group in its efforts to support online course design and faculty development.
 
Karla Kmetz is an Instructional Designer at Distance Learning and Instructional Media Services and Adjunct Faculty in the College of Education at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. With 6 years of experience in education and accessible technologies, her professional interests include universal design for instruction in higher education and the accessibility of online courses.
2/14/2013 10:00 AM2/14/2013 11:00 AMCourse DesignThursdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/14/2013
3
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11:00am12:00pmDesign and Implementation of Universal Course Shell Templates to Enhance Student Outcomes in Online Degree Programs
Art Borgemenke,Texas A&M University-Commerce
Wade Fish, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Chuck Holt, Texas A&M University-Commerce
This presentation details the process implemented by university faculty members of an Educational Administration Master's Degree and Principal Preparation Program to develop a universal course shell template. The rationale behind the need to build a universal course shell template will be addressed, which includes the ability to further a) move toward a true competency-based degree program, b) enhance student learning outcomes, c) maintain a consistent design across course shells to facilitate student comfort levels within an online environment, and d) transition faculty who are previously unfamiliar with online teaching into this delivery method.
2/14/2013 11:00 AM2/14/2013 12:00 PMCourse DesignThursdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/14/2013
4
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1:00pm2:00pmThe Mouse is Dead: Welcome to the Higher Education Classroom in the Post-PC Era
Dr. Chris Penny, West Chester University
Ready or not, we are entering the Post-PC era. A time when mobile technology, such as the Apple iPad, will challenge higher education faculty to guide students through the discovery process, rather than lecture from the front of the room. Mobile technologies can transform the teaching and learning process. In the Post-PC era faculty have an opportunity to implement new pedagogies, and students have opportunities to explore, create and apply learning in powerful new ways.
Dr. Chris Penny is a proud parent of three amazing little boys, Conner (8), Liam (6) and Keagan (4). He is an Professor of Educational Technology at West Chester University and a graduate of Penn State University. In a previous life he was a professional football (soccer) player.

In 2011 he won the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award for his excellence in the classroom. In 2007 he became an Apple Distinguished Educator, and in 2009 a Google Certified Teacher. His efforts in teaching and research have the focus of technology integration in education. He recently published an edited book titled Technology Leadership in Teacher Education: Integrated Solutions and Experiences. Has published articles on eBook readers, eMentoring, 24/7 laptop access for teacher candidates, and ePortfolios. His most recent research revolves around the topic of mobile pedagogy, which is the focus of his latest book to be published in 2013.  Outside of teaching and research he serves on the Apple Distinguished Educator Advisory Board. 
2/14/2013 1:00 PM2/14/2013 2:00 PMiPadsThursdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/14/2013
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2:00pm3:00pmWhat About the Faculty? Creating Faculty Focused Distance Education Professional Development
Tamara Powell, Kennesaw State University
As institutions seek to grow their distance learning programs, they sometimes forget that the bulk of the burden falls on the faculty. A challenge exists in supporting the faculty while also fostering quality distance learning offerings. Over ten years of research on faculty-centered distance learning professional development strategies show that faculty who are slow to adopt distance learning require a specific set of support strategies.
Dr. Tamara M. Powell is the College of Humanities and Social Sciences Director of the Office of Distance Education at Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA and the designer of KSU’s “Build a Web Course Workshop,”  which has trained 135 faculty in creating hybrid and online courses and which won the SLOAN C Award for Excellence in Faculty Development for Online Teaching, 2010. She is a SLOAN-C mentor and 2012 graduate of the Sloan Consortium Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning. And a giant sci-fi nerd.
2/14/2013 2:00 PM2/14/2013 3:00 PMInstitutional IssuesThursdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/14/2013
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3:00pm4:00pmFill the Gap - Mobile First
Rebecca Clark, Defense Acquisition University
Research in online learning led Defense Acquisition University leadership to encourage mobile learning as a primary factor in instructional delivery. In creating the DAU mobile assets that are now accessible via our mobile portal, we came to understand how requirements that call for a mobile solution can fill learning and performance gaps by delivering information, maps, skill development games, and on the job support
2/14/2013 3:00 PM2/14/2013 4:00 PMInstitutional IssuesThursdayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/15/2013
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9:00am10:00amGoing the Distance: Rethinking Pedagogy in an Online Experience
Kristin Sullivan, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Gino Beniamino, Harvard Graduate School of Education
This session discusses the collaboration across departments and between faculty and staff to re-think the way that executive education participants from around the world interact with faculty, peers, and content in order to maximize their learning in a fully online experience. We will also share next steps in our plan, including making the learning more job embedded and making the interactions with content and peers seamless in a mobile environment as well as online.
2/15/2013 9:00 AM2/15/2013 10:00 AMTeaching & LearningFridayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/15/2013
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10:00am11:00amReal-time Instructor and Social Presence in Distance Learning: Overcoming Planning, Training, Delivery, and Logistical Challenges
Dan Lim, Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences
This presentation will present and discuss solutions to challenges in implementing real-time instructor presence, interaction, and peer social presence in distance learning. It includes solutions to issues involving time zones, class size, time constraints, flexibility, logistics, group sign-up, grading of real-time participation, planning, and training for instructor and students.
2/15/2013 10:00 AM2/15/2013 11:00 AMTeaching & LearningFridayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/15/2013
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11:00am12:00pmDeveloping a Pedagogy of ITV Teaching Experience through a Teaching Circle
Kala Chakradhar, Assistant Professor, Murray State
Llena Chavis, Lecturer of Social Work, Murray State
Distance learning through the use of interactive television (ITV) has been a part of Social Work education for more than two decades. Amidst abundant proof of the overall successes of ITV programs, there are limited accounts of the pedagogical experiences and challenges encountered by faculty who are called upon to teach distant learning courses. This session describes a pedagogy of ITV teaching experience derived through a teaching circle in a rural undergraduate program.
Dr. Kala Chakradhar is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Leadership and Human Services, Murray State University, Murray, KY. Her primary teaching areas include research, substance abuse, health care and mental health, gerontology and international social work. She has been actively involved with community coalitions in substance abuse and mental health and the recent chronic disease self-management initiative. She has also garnered extensive experience in distance education (ITV and online). She earned an MSW from the University of Madras, Chennai, India, an M. Phil in psychiatric social work from The National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences, Bangalore, India, and a Ph.D in Social Work from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, India.
 
Llena Chavis LCSW is a Lecturer of Social Work in the Department of Community Leadership and Human Services at Murray State University in Murray Kentucky. Originally from Chicago IL, She completed her MSW at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids MI. and is currently completing a PhD at Southern Illinois University In Carbondale.  Llena has worked primarily in mental health including both outpatient and inpatient work with both children and adults. Currently teaching practice based classes in ITV, Llena also teaches introductory classes, and has taught health care and policy courses in social work. On the side, Llena is a mother of three (expecting her fourth child) and maintains a small private practice in addition to teaching.
2/15/2013 11:00 AM2/15/2013 12:00 PMITV/VideoconferencingFridayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/15/2013
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1:00pm2:00pmTeaching on Television: the Essentials
Bob Hails, Distance Learning Coordinator, Office of the Chancellor, Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
This session will cover the essential skills and knowledege needed by an instructor teaching an ITV/Videoconferencing course.
Bob Hails started his career in distance education 37 years ago.  In that time, he has started distance education programs at two universities and significantly expanded programs at two others.
 
Bob has a Bachelor's Degree in Communications and a Master's Degree in Education from Ohio University.
2/15/2013 1:00 PM2/15/2013 2:00 PMITV/VideoconferencingFridayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
 2/15/2013
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2:00pm3:00pmBest Practices for Organizing Content
Jenny Hanson, Faculty, LMS Campus Trainer at Normadale Community College
 
Nancy Ludden, Instructional Designer at Normadale Community College
Content areas of courses can become quickly filled with information. Participants of this session will learn essential best practices for organizing content in Desire2Learn Learning Environment, using the Course Builder, to cleanly present your information. These best practices will help course designers and educators set-up patterns of learning for students that will make the journey of learning online more user-friendly.
Jenny L. Hanson is a media artist and educator.  Hanson works primarily in video/film and her work has screened internationally. Hanson has also been managing her own production company, Sprouted Wolf Productions, since 1997.  Currently, she teaches Mass Communication and Visual Art at Normandale Community College and serves as the Instructional Management System (IMS) Trainer.  She also teaches Film Production at Augsburg College.
 
Nancy provides instructional design training for traditional and online courses. Prior to serving at the Instructional Designer at Normandale, Nancy was involved in online education or e-learning in several capacities for many years in education development companies. She graduated from the University of Iowa in Education, and taught high school Language Arts.
2/15/2013 2:00 PM2/15/2013 3:00 PMTeaching & LearningFridayDrag icon to your Outlook Calendar.Add to Outlook
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