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Daily News Clips


Friday, September 04, 2015
The State System of Higher Education today announced its board of governors has approved one-year contracts with four labor unions representing about 4,500 professional staff. While the amounts vary, all covered by the collective bargaining agreements will receive salary increases or cash payments, effective January 2016. The agreements expire June 30, 2016.
By Eleanor Chute, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Wednesday, September 02, 2015
For the second year in a row, East Stroudsburg University has seen an increase in student enrollment. University President Marcia Welsh announced Tuesday that fall 2015 enrollment was 6,824 students, which includes a freshman class of 1,320 students, according to a news release from the university.
By Lynn Ondrasek, The Pocono Record

Friday, September 04, 2015
The State System of Higher Education’s board has approved one-year contract agreements with four of its labor unions, the organization of 14 public universities said Thursday. The deals cover about 4,500 employees, the state system said.
By Tim Stuhldreher, Lancaster Online

Friday, August 28, 2015
What started as a community experiment in Seattle in the 1980s has gained enough recognition to work on college campuses, and hopefully, the Pocono community. East Stroudsburg University’s One Campus, One Book program is reaching out to the community for book discussions starting in September. As students were asked to read “Your Face In Mine,” by Jess Row, residents are invited to read the book for upcoming talks.
By Lynn Ondrusek, The Pocono Record

Monday, August 24, 2015

Student debt is binding many new college grads, keeping them at home with mom and dad as they lick their financial wounds. If staying at home weren’t frustrating enough, an increasing number of former students are having trouble recovering at all and are slipping into delinquency and default.
By John Finnerty, The Daily Item

Tuesday, September 01, 2015
Looking toward the coming school year, The Inquirer asked colleges and universities in the region a simple question: What’s new on campus?
The Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday, August 30, 2015
Is off-campus student housing safe? It’s a problem that plagues many college towns and their students — how to be sure off-campus housing meets safety standards, and that off-campus housing doesn't lower the quality of life in surrounding neighborhoods.
By Howard Frank, The Pocono Record

Monday, August 31, 2015
It is too often the case that complex issues cannot fully be explored in relatively short newspaper editorials and articles, and such is the case when it comes to the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties’ position on background checks. Put simply, your editorial (“Keep background checks for university profs,” Aug. 24) is off base, and accompanying it with a picture of Jerry Sandusky in chains is gratuitous.
By Ken Mash (in Lancaster Online)

Friday, August 28, 2015
An outside review of Cheyney University’s financial aid office found that as much as $29.6 million in federal financial aid might have to be returned, more than half of the financial aid received over three years. The actual amount, if any, would be up to the U.S. Department of Education, which has not yet reviewed the findings released Thursday.
By Eleanor Chute, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Friday, August 28, 2015
For the second time in a decade, Cheyney University has failed to properly manage financial aid that it awards students, and as a result may owe the U.S. Department of Education more than $29 million.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday, August 27, 2015
Pennsylvania taxpayers could be on the hook for nearly $30 million in federal student loans and grants awarded to students at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania in 2011-12 and 2013-14.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Tuesday, September 01, 2015
If you’re a parent who recently paid a tuition bill for a college student this fall, you know full well that tuition bills are about as transparent as the pricing of airline tickets. Discounting the published tuition price is a widespread practice throughout higher education. Students have no idea how much the classmate sitting next to them is paying. The sticker price is meaningless, and students who pay more don’t get anything extra for their money.
By Jeffrey J. Selingo, in The Washington Post

Wednesday, August 26, 2015
A generation ago, college freshmen were taught at orientation to head for a “blue light” emergency phone if they felt threatened on campus. Now of course, almost everyone has a cellphone. That puts the potential for safety enhancement as close as a student’s backpack, pocket or purse. Earlier this year, Millersville University adopted LiveSafe, a mobile safety app that connects students, faculty and staff to campus security.
By Tim Stuhldreher, Lancaster Online

Saturday, August 22, 2015
Kutztown University's new president, Dr. Kenneth S. Hawkinson, outlined an ambitious plan for the first 150 days of his administration at the college's traditional opening day ceremony Friday in Schaeffer Auditorium.
By Ron Devlin, The Reading Eagle

Monday, August 24, 2015
The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties has asked the Commonwealth Court to grant an injunction that would stop Pennsylvania’s state-owned universities from carrying out criminal background checks on professors. The 14 state-owned universities include Millersville University. According to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the association filed an unfair labor practice charge last week with the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board. Professors are very smart people. But in this instance, some are kicking up a fuss over an issue they should understand without an explanation.
Lancaster Online (editorial)

Monday, August 24, 2015
Have you ever tried to schedule an event, only to discover that no one’s free time coincides with anyone else’s? That, in a nutshell, is why Millersville University is trying out a “Common Hour” this year.
By Tim Stuhldreher, Lancaster Online

Saturday, August 22, 2015

The mound of clothing, pillows, and belongings piled on top of Cassie Rumbough's bed looked a little daunting. The colorful dorm room was already filled with her possessions and those of her new roommate - including similarly trendy bedspreads and a coffee machine, which both proclaimed to be the most important item in the room.
By Justine McDaniel, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Friday, August 21, 2015
The end of August signals the start of school for students, but it's not just children and teens who are preparing to return to the classroom. Young adults also are getting ready for the start of fall-semester classes at Wilson College, Shippensburg University and Penn State Mont Alto.
By Daniel Barr, The (Chambersburg) Public Opinion

Sunday, August 23, 2015
Sara Garside Ellis could buy a Mercedes sports car with $130,000. Or a vacation condo. Or maybe more important to the physics teacher, a home. But $130,000 is how much Ellis still owes for a degree from Juniata College, a private liberal arts school, and the master’s degree she earned to qualify to teach high school. An unwitting victim of school funding cuts, Ellis left Pennsylvania because she couldn’t land a job in classroom. Instead she lives in Maryland, where she works in a poverty-stricken district in a job that qualifies her for $17,500 in loan forgiveness after five years.
By John Finnerty, The Daily Item

Monday, August 24, 2015
Students and their families should plan ahead and, when possible, be frugal when borrowing for college, education and financial experts say.
By John Finnerty, The Daily Item

Sunday, August 23, 2015
Tentacles of the student loan problem are squeezing multiple generations, say consumer advocates, making it an issue too big to ignore. It's no surprise that a burden weighing upon 40 million Americans – and racking up $1.2 trillion in collective debt – is fodder for early rounds of the 2016 presidential campaign.
By John Finnerty, The Tribune-Democrat