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Daily News Clips


Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Shippensburg University is the first school in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education to offer a degree program in electrical engineering. The PASSHE Board of Governors approved the program on Oct. 9. The new bachelor of science degree program will begin in fall 2015.
(Chambersburg) Public Opinion

Friday, October 17, 2014
Mansfield University has announced its business degree program will continue and new students will be admitted as the department pursues accreditation.
By Lois Wilson, The (Elmira, N.Y.) Star-Gazette

Saturday, October 18, 2014
An unintended open microphone that blared a non-public conversation over the public address system momentarily brought Andre Reed's special ceremony to a halt Saturday at Kutztown University. "That's OK," Reed said reacting to an annoyed crowd. "I've been talked over before." Talked over, overlooked, doubted and cast aside … Reed overcame all kinds of obstacles to make it from Dieruff High School and Kutztown University to four Super Bowls with the Buffalo Bills and, ultimately, into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
By Keith Groller, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Friday, October 17, 2014
Penn State has put its students on notice that anyone traveling to West African countries, the ground zero for the Ebola outbreak, over the Thanksgiving or holiday break will be asked to complete a confidential health questionnaire. Further, the university has placed a temporary ban on official travel to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Saturday, October 18, 2014
Colleges and universities across the country will be required to keep statistics about the number of incidents of dating and domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking on campuses and provide information about how to prevent and report the incidents under new, final regulations that the U.S. Department of Education issued.
By Mary Niederberger, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, October 16, 2014
West Chester University broke ground on a $39 million Business and Public Affairs Center Thursday. The building will bring under one roof all 10 departments, 100 faculty members and 4,000 students in the College of Business and Public Affairs at the university.
By Jim Callahan, The (West Chester) Daily Local News

Friday, October 10, 2014
Leaders of Pennsylvania’s 14 state-owned universities say they are hopeful that a prolonged enrollment slide, fueled partly by declining high school graduation rates, is abating, even as newly released figures confirmed a fourth consecutive yearly loss.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, October 09, 2014
Shippensburg University has won approval to open what will be the first electrical engineering degree program offered in Pennsylvania's 14-school State System of Higher Education. The State System's governing board approved the new program - which is being designed to meet national accreditation standards - at its board of governors meeting Thursday.
By Charles Thompson, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Friday, October 10, 2014
Frank Pogue is taking the reins as interim president at Cheyney University, having retired this summer as president of Grambling State University in Louisiana.
The Associated Press

Saturday, October 11, 2014
Last November, the campus at the California University became awash in tribute and honor as the Veterans Affairs program organizers launched a new program that invited veterans or family members or friends to purchase special banners that then were hung in various locations throughout the campus. This November, the banner program will again be returning to campus, and Veterans Affairs director Robert Prah said that he hopes to see the program grow and continue to be a success.
By Marilyn Forbes, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Thursday, October 09, 2014
Academic advising will soon be required for all students seeking degrees at Bucks County Community College, where officials said they hope to improve graduation rates.
By James McGinnis, The (Doylestown) Intelligencer

Thursday, October 09, 2014
Shippensburg University will become the first state-owned school in Pennsylvania to offer a bachelor's of science degree in electrical engineering.The measure was approved Thursday by the Pennsylvania System of Higher Education's Board of Governors.
By Katherine Reinhard, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Thursday, October 09, 2014
Frank G. Pogue, a former president in Pennsylvania's state university system, will return to become interim president of Cheyney University.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday, October 09, 2014
Dr. Frank G. Pogue, who retired in June as president of Grambling State University in Louisiana, today was selected by the Board of Governors of Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education to serve as interim president of Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.
YourErie.com

Thursday, October 02, 2014
Frank T. Brogan took over the leadership of Pennsylvania’s state-owned university system a year ago with a long to-do list aimed at stemming declining enrollment, rising costs and stifling bureaucracy. He’s been chipping away and has made some significant improvements in the past 12 months.
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (editorial)

Thursday, October 02, 2014
More than a third of students at Pennsylvania's public colleges drop out before junior year. Less than 40 percent graduate in four years. The rate of graduation within six years is 55 percent, but many of those students are adding up to two years of cost and debt. Even though the commonwealth's colleges have higher success rates than most state schools, these numbers are troubling. "We simply have to do better," noted Frank Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. That's the right attitude.
The Philadelphia Inquirer (editorial)

Saturday, October 04, 2014
Dr. Grafton Eliason, a professor of counselor education at California University of Pennsylvania, still remembers the first time he became aware of the American Red Cross. Eliason, 47, was just a boy when a barn storing chlorine for swimming pools caught on fire in Chambersburg, Franklin County, where he grew up.
By Mary Pickels, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Sunday, October 05, 2014
Write what you know. It's common advice for authors, but Natalia Kaniasty put her own spin on it — writing about where she's from and about whom she knows. The 2008 graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania and New York University filmmaking student shot a short film, her pre-thesis project, last fall in her hometown of Indiana.
By Mary Pickels, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Sunday, October 05, 2014
East Stroudsburg University officials are reporting the first increase in student enrollment in four years. The total enrollment for the fall 2014 semester stands at 6,812, up from the university’s 2013 enrollment of 6,778, according to a Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education enrollment census gathered in late September.
By Christina Tatu, The Pocono Record

Monday, October 06, 2014
East Stroudsburg University is signing three articulation agreements with Northampton Community College for those community college students wishing to pursue their bachelor’s degrees in the fields of exercise science, public health or nursing at ESU. These articulation agreements facilitate the smooth transfer of college credits earned at NCC toward these three programs within ESU’s college of health sciences.
The Pocono Record

Sunday, September 28, 2014
In office only 10 days, Frank Brogan used his first campus appearance as State System of Higher Education chancellor last October to deliver a message not so popular with faculty and staff facing job cuts. Retrenchment across the system of 14 state-owned universities may be “the elephant in the living room,” he told an audience at Clarion University. But it nevertheless will help the system evolve in positive ways amid double-digit enrollment losses, sharp state funding cuts and rapidly shifting student demand. Those financial stresses across the 112,000-student system did not abate in the following 12 months. If anything, the strains grew more visible this spring as the system’s largest school, West Chester University, eyed breaking away. Yet this week, as Mr. Brogan marks his first anniversary, the continued troubles are accompanied by signs that a system criticized by some as a slow-moving and inflexible bureaucracy has achieved something else: It is getting more nimble.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Sunday, October 05, 2014
Temple University on Friday announced the creation of a special committee to look into the school's handling of sexual assaults. Universities across the nation are under scrutiny for their policies and practices, and are struggling to respond to mounting pressure from students and the federal government.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, September 29, 2014
One only needs to look to Millersville University to see the impact that Frank Brogan has had on Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education in his first year on the job. With Brogan's backing, the Lancaster County school switched from charging in-state undergraduates the same tuition regardless of whether they took 12 credit hours of coursework or 18 to a new system that charges undergraduates strictly on a per-credit hour basis. At Shippensburg University, Brogan's work to strike a better balance between a centralized system of 14 universities and local campus autonomy is evident in the new presidential selection process being followed there that gives local trustees more say in who will be appointed.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Saturday, October 04, 2014
This fall semester, for the first time, all public universities in Texas were required to offer incoming students the option of a payment plan that fixed their tuition at a particular rate for four years, alleviating the uncertainty of variable annual increases.
By Reeve Hamilton, The Texas Tribune

Monday, September 29, 2014
Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education Chancellor Frank Brogan earned passing grades for his first-year performance from many key stakeholders. But they also have high hopes for his second year on the job. Here is what they had to say about the work he has done and what they want to see him do in Year Two.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Sunday, October 05, 2014
Two students at Bryn Mawr College tacked up a Confederate flag in their dormitory hall and taped a "Mason-Dixon line" across the floor - a move they said was merely a display of their Southern pride. But that display sent the small Main Line women's college into an uproar, with cries of protest from the student NAACP group and others, who called the items symbols of white supremacy, slavery, and hate.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, September 29, 2014
More than one-third of students who start out as freshmen at Pennsylvania's 14 state universities drop out before they reach junior year - a statistic that hinders the viability of the system, which has bled enrollment in recent years. "We simply have to do better," said Frank T. Brogan, who on Oct. 1 will mark his one-year anniversary as chancellor of the 112,000-student Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, October 06, 2014
Matt Sumner was every bit as nervous when he walked into his first college class as he was on the morning he started high school, which makes sense since both were on the same day. "I thought it would be a lot of work, but if you do your studying, you can do it," said Matt, just 14, and a freshman at both Oxford Area High School and Cecil College. Sumner is a pioneer in the Early College Academy, a joint venture between the two schools that will allow him and 19 classmates to receive associate's degrees in the same week they are handed high school diplomas in 2018.
By Kathy Boccella, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday, September 28, 2014
Enrollment at Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities declined for a fourth consecutive year, slipping 1.5 percent to an estimated 110,600 students, after peaking at nearly 119,500 in 2010, preliminary reports show. The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has raised tuition 3 percent, working to reduce a $30 million budget deficit and deflect criticism from lawmakers who insist the system hampered development at some universities. Chancellor Frank Brogan said long-needed changes under way will help, including the way the state allocates money to schools to ensure that enrollment and program costs are factored in.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Saturday, October 04, 2014
The college admissions system is broken. When students submit applications, colleges learn a great deal about their competence from grades and test scores, but remain in the dark about their creativity and character. Essays, recommendation letters and alumni interviews provide incomplete information about students’ values, social and emotional skills, and capacities for developing and discovering new ideas.
By Adam Grant, University of Pennsylvania (in the New York Times)

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
Cheyney University on Wednesday will officially announce the opening of its first new academic building on campus in more than 30 years — a $23 million science center, officials announced.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, September 01, 2014
East Stroudsburg University officials say they have overwhelming demand for the two suite-style residence halls built on campus in the last several years.
By Chris Reber, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Sunday, August 31, 2014
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
By Sysan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Saturday, September 27, 2014
When Alexandra Piampiano first stepped onto the campus of St. Vincent College in the fall, she was considered an upperclassman.  Piampiano earned 24 college credits in subjects ranging from psychology to world history through Advanced Placement exams she took in high school in Webster, N.Y
By Kari Andren, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Friday, September 26, 2014
Parents have always sent their kids off to college with lots of advice: Study hard, do your laundry, don’t spend all your money in the first week. This year, with rising urgency, many are adding serious words of caution. To their daughters: Don’t walk alone at night. To their sons: No means no. To both: Beware of sexual hookups after heavy drinking.
By Nick Anderson, The Washington Post

Saturday, August 30, 2014
Colleges and universities here say they took their cues from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Allegheny County Health Department regarding students returning to campus this fall who are from or who had traveled through West African nations afflicted with the deadly Ebola virus.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Saturday, September 27, 2014
Madeline McDonough had a wistful “what if?” moment, pondering the offer that her school, Goucher College, has made to applicants: Instead of showing us your grades, send us a video.
By Richard Perez-Pena, The New York Times

Sunday, September 28, 2014
California has become the first state to require students on college campuses to receive active consent before all sexual activity. Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday signed into law a bill that will impose this new standard for consent at all colleges that receive state funding, including all public universities and many private institutions where students receive state grants.
By Ian Lovett, The New York Times

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
In January 2011, a University of Pennsylvania student was assaulted about three blocks from campus, allegedly by a "flash mob" of up to 40 youths. Penn did not issue an alert to students about the incident. On Easter weekend last year, a 20-year-old La Salle University student was abducted about a mile from campus and sexually assaulted. La Salle officials did not send out an alert. Five months ago, a 19-year-old Temple University student was walking with her boyfriend a block from campus when a group of teens approached, one of whom beat her face with a brick. Within a half-hour, the same group attacked two other students nearby. Temple waited three days before issuing a statement about the incidents.
By Patricia Madej and Cindy Stansbury, The Philadelphia Daily News

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
In April 1986, Jeanne Ann Clery, 19, a freshman from Bryn Mawr, was raped and murdered inside her dorm room at Lehigh University, in Bethlehem. Four years later, Congress passed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, which dictates how colleges and universities must report crime statistics.
By Dylan Segelbaum, The Philadelphia Daily News