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Daily News Clips


Wednesday, July 20, 2016
A handful of Indiana University of Pennsylvania students are among the 103 college students experiencing the Republican National Convention this week in Cleveland through the Washington Center. Most of the students have picked up temporary jobs and internships during their stay, which coupled with their academic experiences, make for early starts and long days at the RNC.
By Chauncey Ross, The Indiana Gazette

Monday, July 18, 2016
I hate Cleveland. I was programmed to do that, because I was born and raised in Pittsburgh. It’s what we do. After spending a week here, though, prepping for the Republican National Convention, I took to Facebook and apologized to the wonderful people of Cleveland for spending the last 47 football seasons smack-talking their whole, entire town — not just their crummy football team.
By Michele Papakie, IUP journalism professor (in The Indiana Gazette)

Sunday, July 17, 2016
Some people wonder their entire lives if they ever truly made a difference, but one Good Fellowship Ambulance crew member started a program that has, and will continue to save lives — and he hasn’t even graduated from college yet. Ethan Healey, 20, of West Chester, joined Good Fellowship Ambulance when he was 14, became an EMT at 16, and after having friends whose siblings passed away from drug overdoses, started Project Naloxone when he was 17 years old and currently studies at West Chester University.
By Adam Farence, (West Chester) Daily Local News

Tuesday, July 19, 2016
Just back from the U.S. Track & Field Olympic Trials (USATF), Margaret Ottley, professor of sport and exercise psychology and kinesiology, counseled the 2016 U.S. Olympic track and field team during an Elite Athlete Retreat in Los Angeles.
By Candice Monhollan, (West Chester) Daily Local News

Monday, July 18, 2016
Ryan Brannon saw the need for a mobile app to help recovering addicts of his generation when he was a student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania two years ago. With a team of 13 friends and people he found through college networking or online advertisements, Brannon formed a nonprofit, raised $70,000 and is now on the doorstep of filling that need with the public release of the app, My New Leaf.
By Natalie Wickman

Monday, July 18, 2016
You're probably not going to find too many college students willing to wake up at 4:30 in the morning every weekday in the summer to go to work as a food delivery driver. Which makes it a good thing the Northwest Tri-County Intermediate Unit, a regional educational service agency based in Edinboro, connected with Zack Hartin.. Hartin, 22, is delivering meals this summer to hundreds of children at about two dozen sites across Erie and Crawford counties.
By Gerry Weiss, The Erie Times-News

Tuesday, July 19, 2016
The labor strife between the faculty union and management of the 14-university State System of Higher Education is far from over but some minor progress was reported from Tuesday's talks. The focus of the four-hour bargaining session was on distance education and updating the contract's language to reflect the increasing enrollments the system universities are experiencing in online courses.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Tuesday, July 19, 2016
Incoming freshmen at the University of Pittsburgh's Oakland campus will have to dig deeper into their pockets under a new budget that bumps base tuition from $17,292 to $17,688 a year. Pitt officials said the increase, adopted as part of Pitt's $2.1 billion operating budget, amounts to a 2.3 percent increase for Pennsylvania residents attending the school's main campus. Students at Pitt's four regional campuses, including the University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg, will see base tuition increase by 1.9 percent — from $12,452 to $12,688 a year.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Sunday, July 17, 2016
With each Republican and Democratic national political convention, Clarion University professor Kevan Yenerall seems to acquire even more students interested in attending them. This year, two people from the Alle-Kiski Valley are among the 17 Clarion University students awarded scholarships to attend the conventions.
By Christing Manganas, The Valley News Dispatch

Sunday, July 17, 2016
Halfway through his second semester, Jason Moomau felt like he just couldn’t do it anymore. Mr. Moomau hoped to become the first in his family to earn a bachelor’s degree. Growing up in Marion Center, Indiana County, he excelled at math and science, and enrolled in an Indiana University of Pennsylvania Upward Bound program aimed at low-income and first-generation college hopefuls. When it came time to choose a school, he decided to enroll there. IUP was close to home, had a small and supportive campus, and Mr. Moomau liked the school colors, crimson and gray. Though he worked two jobs to support himself during his first semester, one in the financial aid office and one at the Indiana Mall, he stayed on top of his schoolwork and earned a 4.0 grade-point average. Second semester, though, brought anatomy and chemistry, and it just became too much. “I had a meltdown one week,” Mr. Moomau remembers. “I was like ‘I can’t do this. I can’t go to college.’ ”
By Maia R. Silber, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Monday, July 18, 2016
Nearly 1 million skilled jobs will need to be filled across Pennsylvania through 2024, and some industries in high-demand fields may struggle to find people. Those are among the findings of a gap analysis study conducted by the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and unveiled last week at a meeting of the State System’s Board of Governors.
By David O'Connor, Central Penn Business Journal

Friday, July 15, 2016
The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education's board of governors on Thursday approved a $178 tuition increase for state universities this fall - the smallest hike in nine years.
By Vibha Kannan, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday, July 14, 2016
The price to attend Pennsylvania's state universities is going up by 2.5 percent. This increase – the smallest percentagewise the system has had since 2005 – approved by the State System of Higher Education's board by a 9-4 vote on Thursday will boost the yearly base in-state undergraduate tuition rate by $178 to $7,238 a year.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Thursday, July 14, 2016
Students attending Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities will see an $89-per-semester increase in tuition this fall. The increase approved Thursday by the State System Board of Governors means base tuition at the universities, which include Indiana, California, Slippery Rock, Clarion and Edinboro in western Pennsylvania, will be $7,238 a year for Pennsylvania residents.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Thursday, July 14, 2016
The board of governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education approved a 2.5 percent tuition increase for the 2016-17 academic year that will affect more than 100,000 students over the 14 universities. The rise in tuition is the smallest increase in more than a decade, according to State System officials.
By Mike Danielewski, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, July 14, 2016
Tuition will rise 2.5 percent at Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities. The board of Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education voted Thursday to raise tuition by $178 for the 2016-17 school year. That will bring in-school tuition to $7,238 a year, according to a news release from PASSHE.
By Jacqueline Palochko, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Friday, July 15, 2016
The State System of Higher Education will raise its tuition by 2.5 percent for 2016-17, its governing board announced Thursday. Students at Millersville University — one of 14 schools in the state-owned system — will see a higher increase of about 6 percent, owing to its per-credit tuition pilot program.
By Tim Stuhldreher, Lancaster Newspapers

Thursday, July 14, 2016
Cynthia Shapira of Fox Chapel, who is well-known in Western Pennsylvania civic and political circles, on Thursday was elected the first female to lead the board that oversees policies for Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities. Shapira, 60, whom Gov. Tom Wolf appointed to the board of governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education in December, is the fifth person to chair the board formed with the creation of the state system in 1983.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Edinboro University of Pennsylvania launched a $1.2 million renovation project Tuesday designed to create an integrated center providing students access to comprehensive academic and experiential learning as well as support services in one convenient location.
The Meadville Tribune

Monday, July 11, 2016
Thirty dinosaurs, sponsored by various businesses and groups, are on display in Harrisburg this summer in an outdoor sculpture exhibit titled Dino-Mite Summer. One of them, designed by professor Marietta Dantonio Madsen, chair of Cheyney University of Pennsylvania’s Fine Arts Department, is located along the Susquehanna River on Front Street, between Pine and Locust streets.
By Candice Monhollan, The (West Chester) Daily Local News

Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday took a unanimous vote of no confidence in president Neil D. Theobald during a private session, and announced its intention to dismiss him. The board's action, announced by spokesman Kevin Feeley, came after a regularly scheduled meeting.
By Susan Snyder and Steve Bohnel, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tuesday, July 12, 2016
Temple University trustees unanimously approved a 2.8 percent increase in base tuition for undergraduate students at Tuesday's meeting. The board also approved eliminating upper-level tuition rates, which require upperclassmen to pay a higher rate than sophomores and freshmen.
By Steve Bohnel, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday, July 7, 2016
Over three generations, the Michael family forged a deep bond with the University of California, dating back nearly 50 years to when Jay Dee Michael Sr. was the university system’s vice president and chief lobbyist. Family members proudly displayed degrees from the campuses in Los Angeles, Davis, Berkeley and Santa Barbara. And when Mr. Michael died last year, his family asked that memorial donations go to a U.C. Davis institute. Recently, though, the relationship has soured, a victim of the economic forces buffeting public universities.
By Stephanie Saul, The New York Times

Friday, July 8, 2016
The U.S. Department of Education has a tough math lesson for Pennsylvania taxpayers: they're currently spending more on prisons than on public higher education.
By Lizzy Hardison, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Monday, July 11, 2016
With the help of a federal effort to curb recidivism, up to 115 Pennsylvania prisoners will become college students this fall. Villanova University, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Bloomsburg University and Lehigh Carbon Community College will enroll students from six state and federal prisons in Pennsylvania. Classes will take place in-facility, online and over video conference calls, Secretary of Corrections John Wetzel said in an interview.

By Colt Shaw, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Saturday, July 9, 2016
For 50 years, one program at California University of Pennsylvania has prepared more than 2,000 area high school students for success after graduation. The federally-funded TRIO Upward Bound program at Cal U, which serves nine school districts in Fayette and Greene counties, recently celebrated its 50th year of equipping students with college preparation and career guidance.

By Eric Morris, The (Uniontown) Herald-Standard