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Daily News Clips


Sunday, July 26, 2015
Whether you turn on your television, pick up a newspaper, or browse the Internet, the drumbeat these days concerning higher education in the United States is sadly all too familiar and mistaken.
By David L. Coppola, The Scranton Times-Tribune

Sunday, July 26, 2015
At 8 a.m. the day after New Jersey’s first deadly bear attack since the 1850s, forensic scientist Nicole Chinnici’s phone rang.
By Brendan Gibbons, The Scranton TImes-Tribune

Saturday, July 25, 2015

John Grant didn't set out to champion the rights of those with disabilities. Grant, a doctoral candidate and instructor in the English department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, just wanted to teach and finish his degree when IUP hired him in 2012.
By Debra Erdley, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Friday, July 24, 2015
When Shippensburg University students return this fall, they will notice freshly poured sidewalks, green grass and a lack of fencing.
By Staff, Carlisle Sentinel

Sunday, July 26, 2015
College anglers from Slippery Rock and Penn State universities will fish in FLW College Fishing's Northern Conference Championship on the Chesapeake Bay on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 12 and 13.
By Bob Frye, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Monday, July 27, 2015
Disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace, underage drinking, public urination, Animal House behavior.
By Laura McCrystal, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday, July 19, 2015
For the first time in nearly 50 years, in-state students attending Pennsylvania State University will face no tuition increase for the next academic year.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday, July 19, 2015
Perhaps the most important decision the governors of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education make each year involves setting tuition for our 14 public universities. In doing so, we seek to maintain a balance between affordability and giving universities the resources they need to continue to offer high-quality, high-value educational opportunities to students.
By Guido M. Pichini, chairman, Board of Governors

Sunday, July 19, 2015
Voters may have turned Gov. Tom Corbett out of office last November, but his higher education funding legacy remains.
Editorial, Republican Herald

Tuesday, July 21, 2015
West Chester University, in court papers this week, called "nonsensical" claims by its former chief budgeting officer that the school falsely reported deficits to the state to get more funding and fired her after she spoke up about it.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tuesday, July 21, 2015
The union contract between the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties only requires 12 hours a week of teaching to be "full time," 7 percent of the professors can be on full pay and full benefit sabbatical leave at any given time, professors who fill in for those classes get paid "overtime" since they are teaching more than 12 hours a week, professors get two pay raises a year (a general pay increase and an increment step increase), and the kids of professors up to age 25 get free tuition.
Letters to the Editor, The Patriot-News

Monday, July 20, 2015
For the second straight year, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania has been named one of the best colleges in the nation to work for, according to a survey by the Chronicle of Higher Education.
By Jim Martin, Erie Times-News

Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Officials from West Chester - both the university and the borough - are betting on something scientific to help ward off the divisions that have separated communities grappling with the resurgent issue of race.
By Kristin E. Holmes, Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, July 20, 2015
The Pennsylvania House of Representatives’ Local Government Committee gathered in West Chester’s municipal building to hear divergent opinions about House Bill 809 on Monday morning.
By Candice Monhollan, Daily Local News

Wednesday, July 22, 2015
The leaders of Penn State and the University of Pittsburgh both spoke in glowing terms about the tuition rates the schools have set for the coming year.
By the Editorial Board, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, July 23, 2015
The Indiana County commissioners Wednesday approved the filing of an application for $400,000 from the state’s Multimodal Transportation Fund to help pay for design work and engineering on a multimodal corridor in White Township, Indiana Borough and on the Indiana University of Pennsylvania campus.
By Randy Wells, The Indiana Gazette

Friday, July 24, 2015
In this boiling summer sun, your focus is probably on staying cool and hydrated, but did you know that drinking too much can be dangerous, too?
By Tracey Romero, Philadelphia Inquirer

Saturday, July 18, 2015
Scores of Cheyney University alumni met in North Philadelphia this week to discuss the future of the financially strapped school.
By Cherri Gregg, CBS Philly

Thursday, July 16, 2015
Mansfield University President Fran Hendricks honored former president Rod Kelchner with a Presidential Coin for Excellence.
By Dave Bohrer, Star-Gazette

Friday, July 17, 2015
Tuition for incoming freshmen and sophomores at Pennsylvania State University's main campus would rise 2.7 percent, or $450, for 2015-16 under a proposal passed by the board of trustees' finance committee Thursday.
In-state students would pay $17,022, up from $16,572 last year, the university said. Out-of-state students also would pay more.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tuesday, July 14, 2015
Temple University's board of trustees on Tuesday approved a 2.8 percent increase in tuition for the coming year, meaning in-state students will pay $14,398 in 2015-16, up by $392 from the last academic year. Fees for all full-time students will rise by $100, to $790, to accommodate increased costs in activities and technology, said Ken Kaiser, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Saturday, June 27, 2015
Leaders of Pennsylvania’s state-owned university system are preparing to extend to financially ailing Cheyney University another lifeline — a $6.5 million line of credit roughly equal to the combined size of three previous ones.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette