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Daily News Clips


Sunday, September 28, 2014
In office only 10 days, Frank Brogan used his first campus appearance as State System of Higher Education chancellor last October to deliver a message not so popular with faculty and staff facing job cuts. Retrenchment across the system of 14 state-owned universities may be “the elephant in the living room,” he told an audience at Clarion University. But it nevertheless will help the system evolve in positive ways amid double-digit enrollment losses, sharp state funding cuts and rapidly shifting student demand. Those financial stresses across the 112,000-student system did not abate in the following 12 months. If anything, the strains grew more visible this spring as the system’s largest school, West Chester University, eyed breaking away. Yet this week, as Mr. Brogan marks his first anniversary, the continued troubles are accompanied by signs that a system criticized by some as a slow-moving and inflexible bureaucracy has achieved something else: It is getting more nimble.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Monday, September 29, 2014
One only needs to look to Millersville University to see the impact that Frank Brogan has had on Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education in his first year on the job. With Brogan's backing, the Lancaster County school switched from charging in-state undergraduates the same tuition regardless of whether they took 12 credit hours of coursework or 18 to a new system that charges undergraduates strictly on a per-credit hour basis. At Shippensburg University, Brogan's work to strike a better balance between a centralized system of 14 universities and local campus autonomy is evident in the new presidential selection process being followed there that gives local trustees more say in who will be appointed.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Monday, September 29, 2014
Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education Chancellor Frank Brogan earned passing grades for his first-year performance from many key stakeholders. But they also have high hopes for his second year on the job. Here is what they had to say about the work he has done and what they want to see him do in Year Two.
By Jan Murphy, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Monday, September 29, 2014
More than one-third of students who start out as freshmen at Pennsylvania's 14 state universities drop out before they reach junior year - a statistic that hinders the viability of the system, which has bled enrollment in recent years. "We simply have to do better," said Frank T. Brogan, who on Oct. 1 will mark his one-year anniversary as chancellor of the 112,000-student Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Sunday, September 28, 2014
Enrollment at Pennsylvania's 14 state-owned universities declined for a fourth consecutive year, slipping 1.5 percent to an estimated 110,600 students, after peaking at nearly 119,500 in 2010, preliminary reports show. The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education has raised tuition 3 percent, working to reduce a $30 million budget deficit and deflect criticism from lawmakers who insist the system hampered development at some universities. Chancellor Frank Brogan said long-needed changes under way will help, including the way the state allocates money to schools to ensure that enrollment and program costs are factored in.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Sunday, September 21, 2014
Recently named an intern in the Pennsylvania Senate Democratic Research Office.

By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Sunday, September 21, 2014
Tammy Abercrombie thought she did everything right to ensure that her daughter Tyanna, a high school senior at Aliquippa Junior/Senior High School, wouldn't become another student bogged down by college debt. The Abercrombies opened a college savings plan when Tyanna was 7 and diligently socked away cash. But with college looming large and costs averaging about $20,000 a year at public universities — and $40,000 and up at private schools — they're wondering how they will pay the bill.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Monday, September 22, 2014
X.J. Kennedy, an eminent poet, has heard repeatedly how important the West Chester University Poetry Conference is to the writers who attend. It is one of the largest and most respected in the country. So he was heartbroken last week when university officials announced the school was removing the conference's director and canceling next year's event while the Poetry Center finds a new leader.
By Michaelle Bond, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Saturday, September 27, 2014
When Alexandra Piampiano first stepped onto the campus of St. Vincent College in the fall, she was considered an upperclassman.  Piampiano earned 24 college credits in subjects ranging from psychology to world history through Advanced Placement exams she took in high school in Webster, N.Y
By Kari Andren, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Friday, September 26, 2014
Parents have always sent their kids off to college with lots of advice: Study hard, do your laundry, don’t spend all your money in the first week. This year, with rising urgency, many are adding serious words of caution. To their daughters: Don’t walk alone at night. To their sons: No means no. To both: Beware of sexual hookups after heavy drinking.
By Nick Anderson, The Washington Post

Saturday, September 27, 2014
Madeline McDonough had a wistful “what if?” moment, pondering the offer that her school, Goucher College, has made to applicants: Instead of showing us your grades, send us a video.
By Richard Perez-Pena, The New York Times

Sunday, September 28, 2014
California has become the first state to require students on college campuses to receive active consent before all sexual activity. Gov. Jerry Brown on Sunday signed into law a bill that will impose this new standard for consent at all colleges that receive state funding, including all public universities and many private institutions where students receive state grants.
By Ian Lovett, The New York Times

Friday, September 19, 2014
When President Obama and Vice President Biden urged Americans on Friday to end sexual assaults on college campuses, the event included a standard feature for this White House: celebrities.
By Juliet Eilperin, The Washington Post

Saturday, September 20, 2014
College costs have been rising for decades. Slowing — or even better, reversing — that trend would get more people into college and help reduce student debt. The Obama administration is working on an ambitious plan intended to rein in college costs, and it deserves credit for tackling this tough job. Unfortunately, I don’t think it’s going to work, at least not in controlling tuition at public colleges, which enroll a vast majority of students. The plan might dampen prices at expensive private colleges, but some of them may close if they can’t survive on lower tuition.
By Susan Dynarski, The New York Times

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, in Pennsylvania 62% of college students need six years to finish school. In New Jersey, that number is at 66%.
By Justin Udo, KYW News Radio

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
Cheyney University on Wednesday will officially announce the opening of its first new academic building on campus in more than 30 years — a $23 million science center, officials announced.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Monday, September 01, 2014
East Stroudsburg University officials say they have overwhelming demand for the two suite-style residence halls built on campus in the last several years.
By Chris Reber, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Sunday, August 31, 2014
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
By Sysan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Saturday, August 30, 2014
Colleges and universities here say they took their cues from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Allegheny County Health Department regarding students returning to campus this fall who are from or who had traveled through West African nations afflicted with the deadly Ebola virus.
By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
In January 2011, a University of Pennsylvania student was assaulted about three blocks from campus, allegedly by a "flash mob" of up to 40 youths. Penn did not issue an alert to students about the incident. On Easter weekend last year, a 20-year-old La Salle University student was abducted about a mile from campus and sexually assaulted. La Salle officials did not send out an alert. Five months ago, a 19-year-old Temple University student was walking with her boyfriend a block from campus when a group of teens approached, one of whom beat her face with a brick. Within a half-hour, the same group attacked two other students nearby. Temple waited three days before issuing a statement about the incidents.
By Patricia Madej and Cindy Stansbury, The Philadelphia Daily News

Tuesday, September 02, 2014
In April 1986, Jeanne Ann Clery, 19, a freshman from Bryn Mawr, was raped and murdered inside her dorm room at Lehigh University, in Bethlehem. Four years later, Congress passed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, which dictates how colleges and universities must report crime statistics.
By Dylan Segelbaum, The Philadelphia Daily News