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Daily News Clips


Wednesday, February 15, 2017
After posters for an alt-right white nationalist group appeared last week at Kutztown University, the campus is rallying against the message with events including counter-propaganda artwork -- an idea that started with an extra-credit project to turn the fliers into origami. "Don't get mad, get creative," said Vicki Meloney, a professor of communication design who is coordinating an effort to help other schools combat the supremacist message.
By Steve Novak, Lehigh Valley Live

Friday, February 17, 2017
Edinboro University president H. Fred Walker gave a blunt assessment of campus enrollment, academics and finances Thursday, telling an audience that subpar graduation and retention rates and other woes require transformative action for the school to survive.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, February 16, 2017
A Bloomsburg University professor’s work will help NASA launch a mission to a unique metal asteroid thought to be comprised of material similar to what is in the Earth’s core. Michael Shepard, professor and chair of the Department of Environmental, Geographical & Geological Sciences at the college, spent nearly 10 years investigating 16 Psyche, an asteroid measuring 130 miles in diameter and believed to be made of mostly metallic iron and nickel. NASA selected it for 2023 as one of two missions that have the potential to open new windows on one of the earliest eras in the history of the solar system.
By Justin Strawser, The (Sunbury) Daily Item

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
A recent study reported that one in five students at four-year colleges is dealing with food insecurity — and now local institutions are stepping up to help students in need. West Chester University is located in one of Pennsylvania’s wealthiest counties, yet it has a much-needed place for the many students who are struggling. The university’s Dub-C Resource Center offers students free soap, shampoo and other free personal items, school supplies, clothing — and lots of food.
By Cherri Gregg, KYW

Thursday, February 16, 2017
Temple University has announced it will offer "gender-inclusive" housing beginning this fall.  According to the Philadelphia-based university, "This means students can opt to share a suite or apartment on campus with other students regardless of biological sex, gender expression, gender identity or sexual orientation."
By David Wenner, The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Saturday, February 11, 2017
The Edinboro basketball community was in the national spotlight Saturday as the Fighting Scots had their annual Make-A-Wish Day. With the fundraising going on, the Edinboro basketball doubleheader was broadcast nationally on American Sports Network.
The Erie Times News

Sunday, February 12, 2017
Last year’s winner wanted to do something for people suffering from medical conditions that make it hard to swallow. So she started a company that makes pureed foods look like regular food, giving them the chance to dine with friends and family in a more normal setting. The previous year’s winner grew disenchanted with the way she was treated by male car mechanics. So she started a business that employs all female mechanics – and has turned her waiting room into a nail salon. It is that kind of innovation West Chester University will recognize with cash prizes this year for the fifth time as it holds its 2017 Business Idea Competition.
By Brian McCullough, The (West Chester) Daily Local News

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
Twenty-five Philadelphia-area high school students who have learned how to play ice hockey over the years will now be able to attend West Chester University at no cost and graduate college thanks to a $500,000 scholarship made possible by Give Something Back (Give Back) and Ed Snider Youth Hockey.
The (West Chester) Daily Local News

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Faced with a 20 percent decline in enrollment since 2010, California University of Pennsylvania wants to redefine itself as officials at the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education launch a strategic review of all 14 state-system universities. The state-owned university, founded in 1852 as a teacher training institute, will increase its emphasis on science and technology, university President Geraldine Jones said Thursday while addressing faculty and staff at spring semester convocation ceremonies.

By Debra Erdley, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Tuesday, February 14, 2017
“We are not worried about the future,” the president of Lock Haven University said. “We are planning for our future and have been for the past six years.” The president, Dr. Michael Fiorentino Jr., said university finances and academics go hand in hand, and involve a balancing act between “pushes and pulls.”

By Wendy Stiver, The (Lock Haven) Express

Tuesday, February 14, 2017
No decisions have been made yet, but three athletics programs at Lock Haven University may eventually be dropped from the roster of offerings. Under discussion for possible elimination are the men’s track and field indoor, the men’s track and field outdoor, and the women’s swimming teams.
The (Lock Haven) Express

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Adam Jackson discovered that the path to a career can be more complicated than simply deciding whether to attend a four-year college. Unsure right out of high school about what to study, he kept his tuition costs down while exploring options in 2007 by taking community college courses before transferring to Slippery Rock University for his ultimate goal: a bachelor's degree in business. But that degree alone was not enough to land him a job in a still-recovering economy, so he returned to Community College of Allegheny County, and in 2014, finished a certificate in surgical technology that has started him on the road to what he now hopes will be a future selling medical devices.

By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Pennsylvania State University this week banned fraternity parties serving alcohol following the death of a student last weekend and mounting concerns of a task force looking into Greek life on the University Park campus.
By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Have children and a spare $250 a month lying around? Per kid? Then you are well poised to start saving for a four-year, in-state public university. If not, start saving anyway, say experts in college financing.

By Anya Sostek, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Every year, thousands of dollars in scholarship money meant for incoming college students go unused. That baffles school counselors like Nicole Levis in the Avonworth School District. “It’s unreal to me,” said Ms. Levis, who found that she needed a new approach when she learned students thought her method of sharing information was passe. “The kids don’t read their email anymore. I need to try to reach them in the way that they communicate.”

By Molly Born, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Last fall, students were offered a head start on one of most onerous parts of the college application process: the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Two-and-a-half weeks after the FAFSA became available, students, families and others applying to college filed nearly 1.5 million federal aid applications, according to the National College Access Network, citing a U.S. Department of Education official. The Washington, D.C. nonprofit said that represents 4 percent more than were filed through the same time period of the last FAFSA cycle that started Jan. 1.

By Molly Born, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Tuesday, February 14, 2017
When students are unprepared for the rigors of college, schools often require them to take courses to catch up to their classmates. Those remediation courses, though, do not count toward a degree and may delay students from graduating on time, costing them money in the long run. Boston College is taking a different approach to help students with weak academic records by using a set of learning strategies that require no more than one three-credit class. And new research shows the model is paying off as the vast majority of students are graduating in four years, results that administrators say have national implications for improving college completion.
By Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, The Washington Post

Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Pennsylvania’s State System of Higher Education comprises 14 universities dedicated to the mission of providing an affordable, accessible, high-quality education to the residents of our commonwealth. By its very nature — and by design — this mission simultaneously is both inspirational and aspirational. The question becomes: How do we as a system ensure that we continuously, honestly examine ourselves to identify and achieve excellence that results in a real value proposition to our stakeholders? And consider the context: Like so many other state systems and universities across the country, we find ourselves dealing with issues that include lagging state funding, declining enrollment, market changes, and increased operating costs.
By Cynthia D. Shapira, in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Gov. Tom Wolf today proposed no dollar increase in next year’s state budget for the four state-related universities, or for Pennsylvania’s 14 community colleges, but a 2 percent or nearly $9 million boost for the 14-state-owned universities.
By Bill Schackner, The Pittsburghh Post-Gazette

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
The state-owned universities in the State System of Higher Education would receive a nearly $9 million increase under Gov. Tom Wolf's 2017-18 budget proposal while all other public funding for higher education institutions and the state grant program would remain at this year's level or in the case of the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school, be cut out entirely.
The (Harrisburg) Patriot-News

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
Gov. Tom Wolf's spending proposal offers a mixed bag for higher education. The budget proposes an increase of $8.9 million for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, the governing body of the 14 state-owned universities, including Kutztown. The state system issued a statement of appreciation, noting that it would be the third straight year for an uptick in spending, if approved by lawmakers.
The Reading Eagle

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
Gov. Wolf's proposed budget would eliminate all $30 million in funding for the University of Pennsylvania's veterinary school. Penn in a statement indicated it was preparing for a fight.

By Susan Snyder, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Wednesday, February 8, 2017
If the spending plan Gov. Tom Wolf unveiled Tuesday is passed, he will have increased basic education funding by $500 million since he took office. In this third budget proposal, Wolf once again prioritized education spending, which was a campaign promise he made after his predecessor Gov. Tom Corbett slashed it amid the Great Recession.

By Jacqueline Palochko, The (Allentown) Morning Call

Tuesday, February 7, 2017
The Clarion University campus in Oil City is getting a new name again. The university has renamed its branch campus the College of Health and Human Services, effective July 1. The school is now called Venango College and was previously known as Venango Campus of Clarion University.
The (Oil City) Derrick

Monday, February 6, 2017
Have you ever dreamed of learning the arts of writing, photography or tai chi, but never got the chance?
Thanks to an adult learning program — the Millersville University Lifelong Learning Institute — it’s not too late to try. The Institute is offering non-credit courses — anywhere from one to eight weeks long — to the community starting in March.

By Alex Geli, Lancaster Newspapers

Tuesday, February 7, 2017
Nursing students at Edinboro University are experiencing real-life maternity room scenarios without being at a hospital. The students now have on campus the latest, state-of-the-art patient simulator.
Erie News Now

Monday, February 6, 2017
The ever-escalating costs of postsecondary education are daunting. A baby born this year will have to pay about $438,000 over four years to attend a private college and $222,000 at an in-state public college, and then be saddled with enough debt to have to put off having a family. Two-year technical degrees can run as high as $40,000. But the most expensive choice a person can make is to not get a postsecondary degree or certificate.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (editorial)